My first hybrid

IanLorenc
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Re: My first hybrid

Postby IanLorenc » Wed Oct 02, 2013 4:31 pm

I'm experimenting, and seeing what it responds well to. I've tried gradual, gentle acceleration. Now I'm going to try accelerating briskly up to speed, then coming off onto EV to hold that speed.

One immediate difference, is that it doesn't coast on it's own. Come off the power and the regen system kicks in, noticeably slowing the car - even on a very slight decline.
If you want to coast, there's a very, very, very hard to find sweetspot (I'm seeing it more often though, so must be getting better at finding it).
Come off the power, and re-apply the accelerator very, very gently. What you're aiming for, is no lights at all showing on the energy graphic. So the regen system isn't charging the battery and the battery isn't driving the wheels. You're just coasting.

That energy flow diagram is very addictive...if I have an accident, it'll probably be because I was watching that!
Cheers.
Ian.

Guzzlin' them green volts.
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frv
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Re: My first hybrid

Postby frv » Thu Oct 03, 2013 8:05 am

Cheers Ian :)
Have you read up on Warp Stealth (also known as HS (High Speed) Glide)?
Here's a post from across the pond. It's not your car but I think the principle is the same as it's still Toyota's HSD:
http://www.cleanmpg.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1224

Just remember nearly all the energy in the battery comes from petrol plus a small amount from regenerative braking. It's probably best to use the battery pack if you know you are going to crest a hill so you benefit from the regen on the other side otherwise the potential energy is just wasted.

Also found this useful post (edited):

"Avoid using the electric motors when you are on the road since it doesn't have much torque.

Make sure the engine is running while car going uphill.

In traffic jams, try lightly pulsing the engine to get up to 12 mph and then gliding (min P&G) the rest of the way instead of relying on the electric motors to slowly pull your car through the traffic.

Do not use the EV button. You want to avoid depleting the battery pack because that will automatically cause your car to run the engine to recharge the battery pack (to prevent the state of charge from falling to low) and that will cause the hybrid's MPG to drop like a rock.

Regenerative Braking recovers between 30% to 50% of the energy lost from braking - it is more fuel efficient to avoid braking and to conserve your momentum.

Your car will get it's best fuel efficiency when you can re-arrange your normal commuting route to be driven between 25mph to 35mph over 45 minutes/10 miles per trip with as few stops as possible. Trips shorter than 15 minutes/2 miles cause its FE to drop.

You can force your car to recharge its battery by putting your foot on the brake, putting your car in Drive mode, then using your other foot to press on the accelerator hard. The ICE will then recharge the HV battery but this is very costly in terms of MPG ..."
'15 Audi A3 Sportback SE CoD S-Tronic - 5+ year average 55+mpg
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(Retired) '06 Honda FR-V 2.2 i-CTDi - Best/longest tank: 67.92mpg (+51.6%) / 815.5 miles.

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ishtmail
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Re: My first hybrid

Postby ishtmail » Thu Oct 03, 2013 12:21 pm

Wow, sounds to me that if you want to hypermile a hybrid, there's awfully plenty of work involved, a lot more than regular cars...
Or maybe it just seems to me that way, because I'm not thinking about most hypermiling techniques I'm using now with my diesel, and this list you posted, frv, looks like quantum physics to someone not familiar with the hybrids :)
Škoda Octavia Combi 1.9 TDI 90HP, 2004

Best trip: 100,89 mpg (2,8l / 100 km) / 6,8 miles
Best tank: 83,55 mpg (3,38l / 100km) / 990,1 miles
Longest tank: 82,06 mpg (3,44l / 100km) / 1001,4 miles
Average: 72,73 mpg (3,88l / 100km) after 16.452 miles

IanLorenc
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Re: My first hybrid

Postby IanLorenc » Thu Oct 03, 2013 8:31 pm

Excellent link. I'm just poring over it now, trying to make sense of it. It's quite dense, but it seems to cover what I mentioned briefly - that difficult to hit coasting sweetspot, no regen and no battery assist.

According to the trip computer's average MPG display, I'm currently averaging 64.1. That's up from 63.8, earlier in the day...so, well, it's an improvement:
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Cheers.
Ian.

Guzzlin' them green volts.
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frv
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Re: My first hybrid

Postby frv » Fri Oct 04, 2013 6:50 am

Glad to help Ian - come on 70 next ;)
'15 Audi A3 Sportback SE CoD S-Tronic - 5+ year average 55+mpg
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(Retired) '06 Honda FR-V 2.2 i-CTDi - Best/longest tank: 67.92mpg (+51.6%) / 815.5 miles.

IanLorenc
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Re: My first hybrid

Postby IanLorenc » Fri Oct 04, 2013 6:06 pm

Glad to help Ian - come on 70 next ;)
It's possible, I suppose:
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I'm being firmer with the throttle, briskly accelerating up to my cruising speed.
Cheers.
Ian.

Guzzlin' them green volts.
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IanLorenc
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Re: My first hybrid

Postby IanLorenc » Sat Oct 05, 2013 6:57 pm

It'll be interesting to see how accurate this average MPG indication, turns out to be:
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Cheers.
Ian.

Guzzlin' them green volts.
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frv
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Re: My first hybrid

Postby frv » Sat Oct 05, 2013 9:20 pm

70 is beconing. I broke 72 today in my 1.6 ton 6 seater barge, you can do it!
'15 Audi A3 Sportback SE CoD S-Tronic - 5+ year average 55+mpg
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(Retired) '06 Honda FR-V 2.2 i-CTDi - Best/longest tank: 67.92mpg (+51.6%) / 815.5 miles.

IanLorenc
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Re: My first hybrid

Postby IanLorenc » Sun Oct 06, 2013 8:05 pm

I was curious, and so I filled up early. It ended up being 63.86mpg...which is better than average on Fuelly.
Oddly, I think that average MPG readout resets itself with every trip. It was on 67.1 yesterday, but today, after a 2 mile trip to the garage, I checked it and it was on 64.9. At 177 miles into the tank, it shouldn't have dropped that amount in that distance.
:?

Then I was curious about the price difference between diesel and petrol, and the difference it actually makes. I played around with some figures to find out that difference. It seems that if you averaged 63.89mpg over 400 miles at petrol prices, you'd have to average 67.35mpg at diesel prices to spend the same amount at the pump. Not as much difference as I thought:

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Cheers.
Ian.

Guzzlin' them green volts.
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tighterse
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Re: My first hybrid

Postby tighterse » Mon Oct 07, 2013 1:53 am

Makes you think!

My last two cars were a 1.9 TD Touran and before that a 1.8 petrol Zafira. Long term average with the Touran was 61 mpg and 42 for the Zafira. Touran total miles over 3 years was 36,000 and Zafira 33,000. Taking the mid point 34,500 and using your prices fuel costs in favour of the diesel were £1,280.

But, and again using current list prices and comparable cars, the price difference is somewhere between £2,500 and £3,000. So for a low mileage driver there isn't much of a financial argument in favour of a diesel. This is for new cars, what the difference is for used could be is arguable.

But then financial logic doesn't apply in car buying. What would a comparable petrol engined car have cost you and would you have bought one? Would I have bought a Ceed if a VW dealer had upped the trade in by (say) £1,000? (Although even that would not have matched the Kia offer).

Now you've gone and upset an ex-accountant! I'll have to have another sleeping draught!
Kia Ceed 1.6 crdi isg Retired undefeated on 25,720 miles and 62.91 mpg overall

Now driving my second Sportage.

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